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Illinois State NAACP Health Committee

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Below are a few videos you can view for information on stroke and heart attacks.

Amazing heart videos and lessons.

African Americans are at a higher risk for being targeted for having a stroke.

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CLICK HERE TO PLAY VIDEO

Don't ignore the warning signs of a stroke.

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CLICK HERE TO PLAY VIDEO

Know the signs of a stroke.

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CLICK HERE TO PLAY VIDEO

A stroke IS an emergency!

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CLICK HERE TO PLAY VIDEO

Protect your heart.

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Some heart attacks are sudden and intense - the "movie heart attack," where no one doubts what's happening. But most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often people affected aren't sure what's wrong and wait too long before getting help. Here are signs that can mean a heart attack is happening:

* Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.

* Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.

*Shortness of breath. May occur with or without chest discomfort.

* Other signs: These may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness

As with men, women's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain.

If you or someone you're with has chest discomfort, especially with one or more of the other signs, don't wait longer than a few minutes (no more than 5) before calling for help. Call 9-1-1... Get to a hospital right away.

Calling 9-1-1 is almost always the fastest way to get lifesaving treatment. Emergency medical services staff can begin treatment when they arrive -- up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. The staff are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too.

If you can't access the emergency medical services (EMS), have someone drive you to the hospital right away. If you're the one having symptoms, don't drive yourself, unless you have absolutely no other option.

Source: American Heart Association

CLICK HERE TO PLAY VIDEO

Feel free to use these forms to help you choose a healthier lifestyle.

A proper diet is essential to good heart health.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD MEAL PLAN

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Exercise Daily

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD ACTIVITY PLAN

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Know your medications.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD PRESCRIPTION CARD

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Get regular check-ups.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD CHECK-UP RECORD

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IAMWE FILMZ PRESENTS: RUZZIAN ROULETTE

CHICAGO, IL JANUARY 26, 2008

The Chicago Westside Branch NAACP Health Committee presents an IAMWE FILMZ Production, "Ruzzian Roulette," a film about HIV/AIDS and the Hip Hop Generation with special guests, Filmmakers, Ronnell "Falaq" Bennett and Steven "Rukahs" Brownridge on January 26, 2008 at the Gene Siskel Film Center, 164 North State Street, Chicago, IL at 1pm.

"Ruzzian Roulette" is an in your face, award-winning film that takes an up close and personallook at HIV/AIDS and how it affects the Hip Hop generation. This film is being shown in order to encourage and motivate individuals to take personal responsibility for their lives by knowing their HIV status as well as eliminating behaviors that put them at risk for contracting HIV/AIDS.

WORLD AIDS DAY IS DECEMBER 1, 2007

Illinois State NAACP Health Committee Statewide HIV/AIDS Initiative for World AIDS Day - December 1, 2007

The Illinois State NAACP Health Committee is committed to partnering and collaborating with health care providers, the faith-based community, local hospitals, clinics, health departments, schools and other community organizations and individuals that share a common goal of promoting HIV/AIDS awareness, education and prevention.

The Illinois State NAACP Health Committee partnered with the Illinois Department of Public Health, Centers for Minority Health Services to work with local NAACP branches in Illinois for a statewide initiative on HIV/AIDS awareness.

This partnership was formed to mobilize NAACP branches throughout the state of Illinois to collectively host events on World AIDS Day, December 1, 2007 and provide HIV/AIDS education, free HIV testing and promote HIV/AIDS prevention.

FIGHT HIV/AIDS
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KNOW YOUR STATUS!

Gov. Blagojevich announces World AIDS Day in Illinois prevention and awareness efforts

Click to read Governor's Press Release